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12

Feb

there’s this disturbing trend i keep seeing in youtube comments. people often like to say that they’re “raping” the replay button on a video, which makes me incredibly uncomfortable. i’ve seen instances where a comment like that has been upvoted hundreds of times, making it one of the top comments on the page.

i can’t say that there’s even a solution or a way to police this. replying to individual comments sounds sanctimonious as best. but this casual use of the term only belies how much of a cultural shift there needs to be in our understanding of rape.

29

Jan

Design Tip: Never Use Black by Ian Storm Taylor

jayrobinson:

This was probably the best design tip I learned in 2012. If you haven’t read this yet, give it a read.

(Source: jayrobinson)

05

Jan

caffeine free

I browse through job and internship listings pretty often and there’s one cliche I keep coming across and just can’t figure out anymore:

This internship isn’t about fetching coffee—you will be doing real, hands-on work!

At this point in the game, this should be a given for any internship. If your internship program is sending interns on endless coffee runs and stationing them in front of copy machines, your internship program is a joke. And if your assumption is that other internship programs run at this level, I’m not really sure that your’s is much better.

A lot has been said about the exploitation of interns as free or poorly paid labor. If you’re bringing in a lot of enthusiastic young people to do free/cheap work for you, the least you owe them is meaningful work to do.

27

Dec

there are too many layers of nerdiness in the fact that i really want to read an academic paper on the depiction of patriarchy and rape culture in shoujo manga

20

Dec

Thingiverse takes down plans for 3D printable guns parts

via Wired

In a statement obtained by CNET, MakerBot’s attorney said that “Thingiverse has always been, and is currently, evolving … as is the company as it pursues innovation and growth. We have always had the discretion to take action for policy violations. Recent events served as the impetus here to take immediate action (and there were several) and reiterate or emphasize the site’s focus on creative empowerment for products that have a positive impact.”

Related: In November, On the Media did an interview with Cody Wilson, “a law student at the University of Texas, Austin and the head of Defense Distributed, an open source group working on the schematic for a plastic pistol - not a toy – that would be available to anyone.” An excerpt from the interview transcript:

CODY WILSON:  I’m not sure that you can say there are, quote, unquote, “dangerous things.” I, I don’t know. It seems to me a gun is very safe, I mean, very low rates of failure, designed to do what they’re intended to do, you know. I think we’re dancing around things that are more emotional in nature than anything else. And I’d – no, I would never walk up to some – some victim or, or some family member of someone slain by a gun and say, well, you know, better that we have these rights.

But, at the same time, we all recognize the respect of civil liberties, even though we must suffer some social cost. I think gun rights are no exception to that.

08

Dec

gpoy

06

Dec

Just as smartphones revolutionized how we avoid talking to each other and food trucks changed our tolerance for eating while standing on the street, the emergence of data science as a vehicle for expression is going to radically change how we create. It gives us a new way to tell the story of the world around us. Even if it’s just to find out how racist our current location is.
A year ago today I walked out of the News & Record for the last time as editor. Twenty-seven years there, 13 of them as editor. It was a good run. But I wish I had been smarter. After a year as a civilian newspaper reader, I realize how often I worked on the wrong things.

John L. Robinson in Journalism, One Year Later. He reflects very honestly on what he could have done differently at the newspaper. 

The highlights: 

1. On Content

We spent time and precious resources on stories that didn’t matter much to most readers. We should have been writing stories that compelled people to read them. We didn’t do enough investigative pieces. We didn’t do enough good reads. We didn’t do enough of what readers valued.

2. On Digital Innovation:

We didn’t build an inviting, informative, smart community, which is dumb of us because newsrooms are places where smart, creative, fun people work.

3. On Listening:

Had we met with members of the community — readers and non-readers – to listen, learn and improve every other month, perhaps we wouldn’t be in as much trouble as we are.

(via futurejournalismproject)

futurejournalismproject:

New Journalism Startup Combines News, Comics
Symbolia’s a new magazine that tells the news through illustrations. Sources are drawn, and quotes get their own speech balloons.
Their first issue is available for free download now, covering the Zambian Psychadelic Rock, Iraqi Kurds, zoology in the Congo and California’s Salton Sea. They feel, in most cases, like longform reads.
It’s really meant for iPads, though you can download a PDF version. Future issues will be priced at $1.99, and Symbolia plans to publish six a year. Android fans will have to wait, Symbolia people said today, but they’ll begin publishing Ebooks in the Android Marketplace.

futurejournalismproject:

New Journalism Startup Combines News, Comics

Symbolia’s a new magazine that tells the news through illustrations. Sources are drawn, and quotes get their own speech balloons.

Their first issue is available for free download now, covering the Zambian Psychadelic Rock, Iraqi Kurds, zoology in the Congo and California’s Salton Sea. They feel, in most cases, like longform reads.

It’s really meant for iPads, though you can download a PDF version. Future issues will be priced at $1.99, and Symbolia plans to publish six a year. Android fans will have to wait, Symbolia people said today, but they’ll begin publishing Ebooks in the Android Marketplace.

11

Oct

Readers often find their best book recommendations when they aren’t even looking for them. Maybe you’re at lunch with a friend who brings up the new book that you just can’t miss, and reading it sets you on a new path. Or you read about the books that influenced your favorite designer or writer. These recommendations come from nearly everywhere: friends, television shows, thought leaders, and algorithms.

But this process can be cumbersome and difficult, requiring you to jump between multiple applications and devices. The best products tend to pair discovery with consumption in a way where the user doesn’t perceive them as disparate activities— enabling a complete consumption experience. With Oyster, we’re bringing this to books.

When everyone has access to the same library, you can share and curate with confidence. Friends can read the same book in one-click, without having to make an additional purchase or hunt for a link to buy it.

That’s from Oyster’s blog post yesterday, introducing a book app that allows you to pick freely among a wide range of titles for a monthly fee. They’re recreating chance conversations, the creators say, where the problem isn’t about how to get to a bookstore, or how much a book will cost, but rather how much time you have to read all that you want. Not a bad problem to have. Check out Oyster’s site here.

Here’s Fast Company:

There are a handful of subscription-based models floating around, but their focus is usually on a niche selection of titles. Yesterday, Harper Collins announced it will start offering subscription-based business and leadership titles through e-learning company Skillsoft’s on-demand training library. The TED Books app charges $14.99 for a three-month, six-mini-books plan that delivers short titles written by its conference speakers.

But because so much of Oyster’s mission is about helping its users discover new titles, it’s naturally looking to offer as wide a range of genres, publishers, and authors as possible. That means its closest existing competition lies in Amazon’s Kindle Lending Library, which lets $79-per-year Amazon Prime members rent just one book per month, but from a large selection of 100,000 titles.

It’s still very early, though, to come to any conclusions.

(via futurejournalismproject)